Desire For Money Essays

By Mike DuBose

America, one of the wealthiest nations in the world, has a large population that enjoys a standard of life far higher than that of most people on Earth. Even our poorest citizens are considered rich by people in some Third World countries. "Americans are not ashamed of amassing huge quantities of material things, a mindset that differentiates us from much of the rest of the world. ‘Making it big’ and ‘having it all’ are part and parcel of the American Dream," writes Diane Coutu, senior editor at Harvard Business Journal. Unfortunately, much of America’s economic success is driven by greed and the desire for power and money. Our nation is obsessed with these things, and the more we get, the more we want—even if our greed threatens to destroy us. Though many Americans share the motto "Greed is good," like Gordon Gekko, played by Michael Douglas in the 1987 film Wall Street, their greed will eventually lead to punishment for their actions.

The Enron scandal demonstrated how money, power, and the accompanying greed can grow exponentially once we allow ourselves to start down that slippery slope. Our judgment becomes impaired, ethics compromised, and our management style blinded with ambition. What drives people who are so powerful and wealthy to take a path that can lead to prison and, in Ken Lay’s case, death? As I sadly followed the Enron story, I asked myself, "When is enough, enough?"

POWER: I worked for two governors in the 1980’s and was a campaign strategist for politicians from both parties. Thus, I was exposed to many powerful people. I found that many politicians have a high opinion of themselves, often seeking election out of a need for power and recognition that becomes insatiable once they’re in office.

Business leaders are not immune to this lust for power. When I was around those prominent people, I felt powerful, too! However, in Good to Great, Jim Collins contends that the most successful leaders do not intentionally seek power or recognition. In fact, he describes them as humble. Servant leaders earn recognition and power and lead with care, respect and ethical behavior. My early access to powerful people led to problems I had with one of the seven deadly sins later in life

GREED: Once, a colleague told me with great conviction, “Mike, you have a mean greedy streak! And one day, it’s going to be your downfall!"

I was taken aback by her criticism but reluctantly admitted that she was right. At the time, all I thought of was making more and more money. I was on an unyielding course of self-destruction and was determined to become a multimillionaire and own a corporate jet no matter what the intangible costs. I was allowing greed to control my life, sacrificing the well-being of my staff, my family and myself.

My colleague’s words, with God’s help, caused me to take inventory of my life. I realized that my lust for money and power came from a deep-seated need to overcome feelings from my childhood. Freud was right—childhood experiences influence our adult lives. My parents divorced in an era when people stayed married for life and my mother struggled financially. When I was in high school, we moved into the "big city" of Darlington, SC and I quickly ensconced myself with the popular crowd. They all had dreams of going to college, so I decided to go, too. When I met with my guidance counselor, she was not very encouraging. "Mike," she said with a smirk on her face, "College is just a waste of time for you. You will never amount to anything!"

However, I went on to college and graduated in three years with honors and later obtained a graduate degree. Fast forward 30 years: my childhood insecurities fueled my desire for wealth and power. If you had asked me two years ago what I liked to do for fun, my answer would have been, "I like to make money! It’s fun!" And the problem was…I was good at it!

LOVE OF MONEY: Money isn’t the root of all evil—the love of money is. Recently, I shared with a well-known Midlands millionaire my passion for helping other business owners learn from my mistakes now that I had achieved reasonable success. I told him that I never dreamed I would accomplish the things I have and that I was satisfied with where I was in my life. Without blinking, he quipped, "Not me!" Sadly, I see many business owners like him, flying blindly down the road of unhappiness, driven by the insatiable success itch, chasing that elusive gold at the end of the rainbow.

Greed, power, and the love of money have ruined many business owners—and their companies. Blinded by their lust for more power and money, they self-destruct, leaving behind insecure children and unhappy spouses, not to mention the poor health they experience from the stress of never reaching their unattainable goals.

BEATING THE MONSTER: If you’re the captain of the ship and greed and power are steering you toward an iceberg, change course! The scenery may be a little nicer on the other route, but you may find that you’ll be just as content taking a slower-paced journey.

Recently, I promised my employees that money will not drive our company or the decisions we make. My team leaders and I remain keenly aware that we have to pay the bills and make a good profit, but if we don’t run people into the ground trying to keep the money rolling in, I believe the result will be happier employees who work smarter, not harder. We also decided to give away half the profits that the Columbia Conference Center generates to charity and schools to make our world a better place.

I have learned firsthand that it’s much more productive to appreciate what you have. Hold on to high quality standards, but be satisfied with a little less of the green stuff. Personally, I have learned that inner peace and contentment pay much richer dividends than a whopping cash flow. By the way, I still haven’t given up on that corporate jet!

---

Mike DuBose is a graduate of the University of South Carolina and a native of Darlington, S.C. and has lived in Irmo, S.C. for the past 30 years. He is president of Research Associate, Columbia Conference Center, and The Evaluation Group and has served as an administrator with seven state agencies, a private non-profit organization, and for two governors. He is also a former deacon at Saint Andrews Presbyterian Church, where he teaches Sunday school. If you have experienced a similar story, as others have reported to Mike, please e-mail him at www.mikedubose.com.

© Copyright 2008-2013 by Mike DuBose. All Rights Reserved. You have permission to forward this article to a friend or colleague and to distribute it as part of personal or professional use during the year 2008 in its full content with all credits to the author. However, no part of this article may be altered or published in any other manner without the written consent of the author. If you would like written approval to post this information on an appropriate web site or to publish this information, please contact Katie Beck at Katie@grantexperts.com and explain how the article will be used. We appreciate you honoring our hard work and we try to accommodate any requests in a timely fashion. Shorter versions of some articles are available upon request.

Money is commonly defined by the functions attached to any good or token that functions in trade as a medium of exchange, store of value, and unit of account, although economics offers various definitions.

A[edit]

Alphabetized by author or source
  • This planet has — or rather had — a problem, which was this: most of the people living on it were unhappy for pretty much of the time. Many solutions were suggested for this problem, but most of these were largely concerned with the movement of small green pieces of paper, which was odd because on the whole it wasn't the small green pieces of paper that were unhappy.
  • All the perplexities, confusions, and distresses in America arise, not from defects in their constitution or confederation, nor from want of honor or virtue, as much from downright ignorance of the nature of coin, credit, and circulation.
  • Money, now this has to be some good shit.
  • The usual definition of the functions of money are that money is a medium of exchange, a measure of value, a standard of deferred payment and a store of value.
  • If you make money your god, it will plague you like the devil.
    • Anonymous proverb as quoted in Select Proverbs of All Nations (1824), Thomas Fielding; this has sometimes been mistakenly attributed to Henry Fielding
  • Plato said that virtue has no master. If a person does not honor this principle and rejoice in it, but is purchasable for money, he creates many masters for himself.
  • Money makes the man.
    • Aristodemus. See Alcæus, Fragment. Miscel. Songs. Reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 521-24.

B[edit]

  • Divitiæ bona ancilla, pessima domina.
  • Translations:
    Riches are a good handmaid, but the worst mistress.
    Wealth is a good servant, a very bad mistress
    L'argent est un bon serviteur, et un méchant maître
    Money is a good servant, a dangerous master.
    • Francis Bacon, De Dignitate et Augmentis Scientiarum (1623), Book Six
    • The last two have sometimes been attributed to Dominique Bouhours, but are probably just translations of Bacon's words.
  • L'argent est un bon serviteur, mais un méchant maître.
    • Money is a good servant but a bad master.
    • Quoted by Francis Bacon. (French Proverb.) In Menegiana, II. 296. 1695. Reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 521-24.
  • Money is like muck, not good except it be spread.
  • I look at Paris Hilton, think about her parents' fortune and her grandparents' fortune. She thought she had it all together. A whole lot of people think that, that when you got money you can do anything you want to do. But I want to tell you there are some things money can't do for you; Money can buy you a house, but can't buy you a home; Money can buy you food to put on your table, but can't buy an appetite; Money can buy you one of the most finest matresses in the world, but can't buy you sleep.
  • If money is, as it is often posited, the root of all evil, then where does that leave greed? Let's do the math: Greed takes up most of your time and most of your money, so therefore greed = time x money. And, as we all know, time = money. Ergo, greed = money x money. So, if money is the square root of all evil, then we are forced to conclude that greed is evil as well, perhaps even more so, in that it forced us to do math.
    But when does the desire to simply possess something turn into unchecked greed? That's easy: when the things that you possess start possessing you.
    • Dale E. Basye and Bob Dob, in Rapacia: The Second Circle of Heck (2009), "Backword", p. 361.
  • The sinews of business (or state).
    • Bion. In Life of Bion by Diogenes Laertius, Book IV, Chapter VII, Section 3. Reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 521-24.
  • The accuser of sins by my side doth stand,
    And he holds my money bag in his hand;
    For my worldly things God makes him pay;
    And he'd pay for more, if to him I would pray.
    • William Blake, as quoted in Life of William Blake : Pictor Ignotus (1863) by Alexander Gilchrist.
  • We could never imagine what a strange disproportion a few or a great many pieces of money make between men, if we did not see it every day with our own eyes.
  • And who can suffer injury by just taxation, impartial laws and the application of the Jeffersonian doctrine of equal rights to all and special privileges to none? Only those whose accumulations are stained with dishonesty and whose immoral methods have given them a distorted view of business, society and government. Accumulating by conscious frauds more money than they can use upon themselves, wisely distribute or safely leave to their children, these denounce as public enemies all who question their methods or throw a light upon their crimes.
    • William Jennings Bryan, speech at Madison Square Garden, New York, 30 August 1906, at a reception welcoming Bryan on his return from a year's trip around the world. Speeches of William Jennings Bryan, Funk & Wagnalls, 1909, p. 90
    • Often misquoted as: The money power denounces, as public enemies, all who question its methods or throw light upon its crimes.Ignotus, 1863.
  • Money well managed deserves, indeed, the apotheosis to which she was raised by her Latin adorers; she is Diva Moneta — a goddess.
  • The greediness of gain is the only principle on which a stranger can be induced to furnish a stranger.
    • Burnett, J., Earl of Chesterfield v. Janssen (1750), 2 Ves. 125. Reported in James William Norton-Kyshe, The Dictionary of Legal Quotations (1904), p. 177.
  • Money is the source of the greatest vice, and that nation which is most rich, is most wicked.
    • Frances Burney, The Journals and Letters of Fanny Burney, entry for 17 November 1768.
  • Penny wise, pound foolish.
    • Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy (1621), Democritus to the Reader, p. 35. (Ed. 1887).
  • Still amorous, and fond, and billing,
    Like Philip and Mary on a shilling.
  • Money…is the symbol of duty, it is the sacrament of having done for mankind that which mankind wanted. Mankind may not be a very good judge, but there is no better.
  • How beauteous are rouleaus! how charming chests
    Containing ingots, bags of dollars, coins
    (Not of old victors, all whose heads and crests
    Weigh not the thin ore where their visage shines,
    But) of fine unclipt gold, where dully rests
    Some likeness, which the glittering cirque confines,
    Of modern, reigning, sterling, stupid stamp;—
    Yes! ready money is Aladdin's lamp.

C[edit]

  • A man wants to earn money in order to be happy, and his whole effort and the best of a life are devoted to the earning of that money. Happiness is forgotten; the means are taken for the end.
  • It's a kind of spiritual snobbery that makes people think they can be happy without money.
  • Money, which is of very uncertain value, and sometimes has no value at all and even less.
    • Thomas Carlyle, Frederick the Great, Book IV, Chapter III. Reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 521-24.
  • If money is all that a man makes, then he will be poor — poor in happiness, poor in all that makes life worth living.
    • Herbert N. Casson cited in: Forbes magazine (1950) The Forbes scrapbook of Thoughts on the business of life. p. 302.
  • Capitalism is using its money; we socialists throw it away.
    • Fidel Castro, as quoted in The Observer (British) newspaper (8 November 1964).
  • Make ducks and drakes with shillings.
    • George Chapman, Eastward Ho, scene 1, Act I. (Written by Chapman, Jonson, Marston). Reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 521-24.
  • Despising money is like toppling a king off his throne.
  • L’intérêt d’argent est la grande épreuve des petits caractères, mais ce n’est encore que la plus petite pour les caractères distingués.
    • Money is the greatest concern for small characters, but is nothing but the smallest for great characters.
  • Money is a symbol of what others in your society owe you, or your claim on particular amounts of the society's resources.
  • The way to resumption is to resume.
    • Salmon P. Chase, letter to Horace Greeley (May 17, 1866). Reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 521-24.
  • Therefor my theme is yet, and ever was—
    Radix malorum est cupiditas.
    Thus can I preche agayn that same vyce
    Which that I use, and that is avaryce.
  • To be clever enough to get all that money, one must be stupid enough to want it.
  • The purified righteous man has become a coin of the Lord, and has the impress of his King stamped upon him.
    • Clement of Alexandria, in Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895), p. 104.
  • I knew once a very covetous, sordid fellow who used to say, "Take care of the pence, for the pounds will take care of themselves."
  • Where large sums of money are concerned, it is advisable to trust nobody.
  • I never heard of an old man forgetting where he had buried his money. Old people remember what interests them: the dates fixed for their lawsuits, and the names of their debtors and creditors.
  • So pleasant it is to have money, heigh-ho!
    So pleasant it is to have money.
  • As I sat at the Café I said to myself,
    They may talk as they please about what they call pelf,
    They may sneer as they like about eating and drinking,
    But help it I cannot, I cannot help thinking
    How pleasant it is to have money, heigh-ho!
    How pleasant it is to have money!
    • Arthur Hugh Clough, Spectator Ab Extra. Reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 521-24.
  • To cure us of our immoderate love of gain, we should seriously consider how many goods there are that money will not purchase, and these the best; and how many evils there are that money will not remedy, and these the worst.
    • Charles Caleb Colton, Lacon: Or, Many Things in Few Words : Addressed to Those who Think (1836), p. 149.
  • No State shall enter into any Treaty, Alliance, or Confederation; grant Letters of Marque and Reprisal; coin Money; emit Bills of Credit; make any Thing but gold and silver Coin a Tender in Payment of Debts; pass any Bill of Attainder, ex post facto Law, or Law impairing the Obligation of Contracts, or grant any Title of Nobility.
  • To make money honestly is to preach the gospel.
  • Love is the grandest thing on God's earth, but fortunate the lover who has plenty of money.
  • Money was made, not to command our will,
    But all our lawful pleasures to fulfil.
    Shame and woe to us, if we our wealth obey;
    The horse doth with the horseman run away.
    • Abraham Cowley, Imitations, Tenth Epistle of Horace, Book I, line 75. Reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 521-24.
  • To virgin minds, which yet their native whiteness hold,
    Not yet discoloured with the love of gold
    (That jaundice of the soul,
    Which makes it look so gilded and so foul) ...
  • Stamps God's own name upon a lie just made,
    To turn a penny in the way of trade.
    • William Cowper, Table Talk, line 421. Reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 521-24.

D[edit]

  • I have never seen more senators express discontent with their jobs. … I think the major cause is that, deep down in our hearts, we have been accomplices to doing something terrible and unforgivable to this wonderful country. Deep down in our hearts, we know that we have bankrupted America and that we have given our children a legacy of bankruptcy. .. We have defrauded our country to get ourselves elected.
    • John Danforth, Republican senator from Missouri, reported in the Arizona Republic (21 April 1992).
  • The sinews of affairs are cut.
    • Attributed to Demosthenes by Æschines, Adv. Ctesiphon. Reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 521-24.
  • The grabbing hands
    Grab all they can
    All for themselves, after all
    It's a competitive world
    Everything counts in large amounts
  • As a general rule, nobody has money who ought to have it.
  • The sweet simplicity of the three per cents.
    • Benjamin Disraeli, in the House of Commons (Feb. 19, 1850). Endymion (1818), Chapter XCVI. Reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 521-24.
  • "The American nation in the Sixth Ward is a fine People," he says. "They love th' eagle," he says. "On the back iv a dollar."
    • F. P. Donne, Mr. Dooley in Peace and War, Oratory on Politics. Reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 521-24.
  • Money never made a man happy yet, nor will it. There is nothing in its nature to produce happiness. The more a man has, the more he wants. Instead of its filling a vacuum, it makes one. If it satisfies one want, it doubles and trebles that want another way. That was a true proverb of the wise man, rely upon it: "Better is little with the fear of the Lord, than great treasure, and trouble therewith."
    • David Alfred Doudney "Old Jonathan's" jottings; or, Light and lessons from daily life (1869), p. 18; published earlier in the magazine Old Jonathan, or the Parish Helper
    • Often misattributed to Benjamin Franklin

E[edit]

  • Wine maketh merry: but money answereth all things.
    • Ecclesiastes. X. 19. Reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 521-24.
  • If our nation can issue a dollar bond, it can issue a dollar bill. The element that makes the bond good, makes the bill good, also. The difference between the bond and the bill is the bond lets money brokers collect twice the amount of the bond and an additional 20%, whereas the currency pays nobody but those who contribute directly in some useful way. It is absurd to say that our country can issue $30 million in bonds and not $30 million in currency. Both are promises to pay, but one promise fattens the usurers and the other helps the people.
  • The elegant simplicity of the three per cents.
    • Lord Eldon. See Campbell, Lives of the Lord Chancellors, Volume X, Chapter CCXII.
  • Money, which represents the prose of life, and is hardly spoken of in parlors without apology, is, in its effects and laws, as beautiful as roses.
  • Money often costs too much.
  • It is not, believe me, the chief end of man that he should make a fortune and beget children whose end is likewise to make fortunes, but it is, in few words, that he should explore himself — an inexhaustible mine — and external nature is but the candle to illuminate in turn the innumerable and profound obscurities of the soul.
  • If I can acquire money and also keep myself modest and faithful and magnanimous, point out the way, and I will acquire it.
    • Epictetus, "The Encheiridion, or Manual, XXIV" (c. 135 A.D.), as translated by George Long, The Discourses of Epictetus with the Encheiridion and Fragments (1890), p. 388

F[edit]

  • Almighty gold.
    • George Farquhar, Recruiting Officer, III. 2. Reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 521-24.
  • Penny saved is a penny got.
  • Ah, take the Cash in hand and waive the rest;
    Oh, the brave Music of a distant Drum!
  • Money. Cause of all evil, Auri sacra fames. The god of the day—but not to be confused with Apollo. Politicians call it emoluments; lawyers, retainers; doctors, fees; employees, salary; workmen, pay; servants, wages. "Money is not happiness."
  • Let every man abide in the art or employment wherein he was called. And for their labor they may receive all necessary things, except money. ... Let none of the brothers, wherever he may be or whithersoever he may go, carry or receive money or coin in any manner, or cause it to be received, either for clothing, or for books, or as the price of any labor, or indeed for any reason, except on account of the manifest necessity of the sick brothers.
  • We ought not to have more use and esteem of money and coin than of stones. And the devil seeks to blind those who desire or value it more than stones. Let us therefore take care lest after having left all things we lose the kingdom of heaven for such a trifle. And if we should chance to find money in any place, let us no more regard it than the dust we tread under our feet. ... And let the brothers in nowise receive money for alms or cause it to be received, seek it or cause it to be sought.
  • There are three faithful friends,
an old wife, an old dog, and ready money.
  • If you'd lose a troublesome visitor, lend him money.
  • If you would know the value of money, go and try to borrow some.
  • The use of money is all the advantage there is in having money.
  • Remember, that time is money. He that can earn ten shillings a day by his labor, and goes abroad, or sits idle, one half of that day, though he spends but sixpence during his diversion or idleness, ought not to reckon that the only expense; he has really spent, or rather thrown away, five shillings besides. [...] Remember, that money is the prolific, generating nature. Money can beget money, and its offspring can beget more, and so on. Five shillings turned is six, turned again is seven and threepence, and so on, till it becomes a hundred pounds. The more there is of it, the more it produces every turning, so that the profits rise quicker and quicker. He that kills a breeding feline taint, destroys all her offspring to the thousandth generation. He that murders a crown, destroys all that it might have produced, even scores of pounds.
    • Benjamin Franklin as quoted in Max Weber's "The Protestant Ethic and The Spirit of Capitalism" (Penguin Books, 2002) translated by Peter Baehr and Gordon C. Wells, 9–12.
  • 'Tis money that begets money.

G[edit]

  • In numerous years following the war, the Federal Government ran a heavy surplus. It could not (however) pay off its debt, retire its securities, because to do so meant there would be no bonds to back the national bank notes. To pay off the debt was to destroy the money supply.
  • It would convert the Treasury of the United States into a manufactory of paper money. It makes the House of Representatives and the Senate, or the caucus of the party which happens to be in the majority, the absolute dictator of the financial and business affairs of this country. This scheme surpasses all the centralism and all the Caesarism that were ever charged upon the Republican party in the wildest days of the war or in the events growing out of the war.
  • "I would not steal a penny, for my income's very fair—
    I do not want a penny—I have pennies and to spare—
    And if I stole a penny from a money-bag or till,
    The sin would be enormous—the temptation being nil.
  • The earning of money should be a means to an end; for more than thirty years — I began to support myself at sixteen — I had to regard it as the end itself.
  • The money pigs of capitalist democracy… Money has made slaves of us… Money is the curse of mankind. It smothers the seed of everything great and good. Every penny is sticky with sweat and blood.
    • Joseph Goebbels, quoted in The Nazi Party: A Complete History 1919-1945, Dietrich Orlow, New York: NY, Enigma Books, 2012, p 61. Goebbels’ article, “Nationalsozialisten aus Berlin und aus dem Reich”, Voelkischer Beobachter, Feb. 4, 1927
  • Ein Mensch, der um anderer willen, ohne dass es seine eigene Leidenschaft, sein eigenes Bedürfnis ist, sich um Geld oder Ehre oder sonst etwas abarbeitet, ist immer ein Tor.
    • A man who works at another’s will, not for his own passion or his own need, but for money or honor, is always a fool.
  • Most Americans have no real understanding of the operation of the international money lenders... The accounts of the Federal Reserve System have never been audited. It operates outside the control of Congress and... manipulates the credit of the United States.
    • Sen. Barry Goldwater (R-AZ), With No Apologies: The Personal and Political Memoirs of United States Senator Barry M. Goldwater (1979).
  • With money, so they all profess —
    And I've no wish to beg the question —
    One cannot purchase Happiness
    Or Peace of Mind, or yet Success,
    Or a robust digestion;
    But one can buy a good cigar
    And plovers' eggs and caviare!
    • Harry Graham, 'The Millionaire', The World's Workers (1928).
  • If there's no money in poetry, neither is there poetry in money.
    • Robert Graves (1895–1985), English novelist and poet. 'Mammon', Mammon and the Black Goddess (1965).
  • It is true that the masses have always been led in one manner or another, and it could be said that their part in history consists primarily in allowing themselves to be led, since they represent a merely passive element, a “matter” in the Aristotelian sense of the word. But, to lead them today, it is sufficient to dispose of purely material means, … and this shows clearly to what depths our age has sunk. At the same time the masses are made to believe that they are not being led, but that they are acting spontaneously and governing themselves, and the fact that they believe this is a sign from which the extent of their stupidity may be inferred.
    • René Guénon, The Crisis of the Modern World (1927), p. 109.

H[edit]

  • This bank-note world.
    • Fitz-Greene Halleck, Alnwick Castle. Reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 521-24.
  • To be controlled in our economic pursuits means to be always controlled unless we declare our specific purpose. Or, since when we declare our specific purpose we shall also have to get it approved, we should really be controlled in everything.
    • Friedrich Hayek, The Road to Serfdom (1944), Chapter 7, "Economic Control and Totalitarianism".
  • If you are different, you had better hide it, and pretend to be solemn and wooden-headed. Until you make your fortune. For most wooden-headed people worship money; and, really, I do not see what else they can do.
    • Oliver Heaviside, Electromagnetic Theory (1912), Volume III; "The Electrician", p. 1.
  • Get to live;
    Then live, and use it; else, it is not true
    That thou hast gotten. Surely use alone
    Makes money not a contemptible stone.
    • George Herbert, The Temple (1633), The Church Porch, Stanza 26. Reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 521-24.
  • Would you know what money is, go borrow some.
  • Fight thou with shafts of silver, and o'ercome
    When no force else can get the masterdome.
    • Robert Herrick, Money Gets the Mastery. Reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 521-24.
  • Every era has a currency that buys souls. In some the currency is pride, in others it is hope, in still others it is a holy cause. There are of course times when hard cash will buy souls, and the remarkable thing is that such times are marked by civility, tolerance, and the smooth working of everyday life.
  • How widely its agencies vary,—
    To save, to ruin, to curse, to bless,—
    As even its minted coins express,
    Now stamp'd with the image of good Queen Bess,
    And now of a Bloody Mary.
    • Thomas Hood, Miss Kilmansegg, Her Moral. Reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 521-24.
  • They may talk of the plugging and sweating
    Of our coinage that's minted of gold,
    But to me it produces no fretting
    Of its shortness of weight to be told:
    All the sov'reigns I'm able to levy
    As to lightness can never be wrong,
    But must surely be some of the heavy,
    For I never can carry them long.
    • Thomas Hood (1799–1845), 'Epigram on the Depreciated Money', Hood's Own, Second Series (1861).
  • Si possis recte, si non, quocumque mondo rem.
    By right means, if you can, but by any means make money.
  • Quærenda pecunia primum est; virtus post nummos.
    • Money is to be sought for first of all; virtue after wealth.
    • Horace, Epistles, I. 1. 53. Reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 521-24.
  • Rem facias rem,
    Recte si possis, si non, quocumque modo rem.
    • Money, make money; by honest means if you can; if not, by any means make money.
    • Horace, Epistles, I. 1. 65. Reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 521-24.
  • Quo mihi fortunam, si non conceditur uti?
    Of what use is a fortune to me, if I can not use it?
    • Horace, Epistles, I. 5. 12. Reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 521-24.
  • Et genus et formam regina pecunia donat.
    • All powerful money gives birth and beauty.
    • Horace, Epistles, 1. 6. 37. Reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 521-24.
  • Licet superbus ambules pecuniæ,
    Fortuna non mutat genus.
    • Though you strut proud of your money, yet fortune has not changed your birth.
    • Horace, Epodi, IV. 5. Reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 521-24.
  • Populus me sibilat, at mihi plaudo
    Ipse domi, simul ac nummos contemplor in arca.
    • The people hiss me, but I applaud myself at home, when I contemplate the money in my chest.
    • Horace, Satires, I. 1. 66. Reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 521-24.
  • MAKE MONEY. MAKE MORE MONEY. MAKE OTHER PEOPLE PRODUCE SO AS TO MAKE MORE MONEY.

I[edit]

  • The almighty dollar, that great object of universal devotion throughout our land, seems to have no genuine devotees in these peculiar villages.
    • Washington Irving, Creole Village, in Wolfert's Roost. Appeared in Knickerbocker Magazine (Nov., 1836). Reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 521-24.

J[edit]

  • There should, I feel, be one branch [of the Black Panther Party] that is purely political, operating the rent strikes, the breakfast programs, the People's Bazaar's where all sorts of food are sold, hospitals or clinics (free, of course), and what I will term cottage shops to employ those who will work for the new medium of exchange—love and loyalty.
  • Whilst that for which all virtue now is sold,
    And almost every vice, almighty gold.
    • Ben Jonson, Epistle to Elizabeth, Countess of Rutland. Reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 521-24.
  • Get money; still get money, boy;
    No matter by what means.
    • Ben Jonson, Every Man in His Humour, Act II, scene 3. Reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 521-24.
  • Quantum quisque sua nummorum condit in arca,
    Tantum habet et fidei.
    • Every man's credit is proportioned to the money which he has in his chest.
    • Juvenal, Satires, III. 143. Reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 521-24.
  • Ploratur lacrimis amissa pecunia veris.
    • Money lost is bewailed with unfeigned tears.
    • Juvenal, Satires, XIII. 134. Reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 521-24.
  • Crescit amor nummi quantum ipsa pecunia crescit.
    • The love of money grows as the money itself grows.
    • Juvenal, Satires, XIV. 139. Reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 521-24.
  • Ploratur lacrimis amissa pecunia veris.
  • Lost money is wept for with real tears.
  • Crescit amor nummi quantum ipsa pecunia crescit,
    Et minus hanc optat, qu non habet.
  • Increase of wealth increases our desires
    And hew, who least possesses, least requires.
  • Alt. Translation: The love of money grows as the money itself grows.
  • It is maintained by some that the bank is a means of executing the constitutional power "to coin money and regulate the value thereof." Congress have established a mint to coin money and passed laws to regulate the value thereof. The money so coined, with its value so regulated, and such foreign coins as Congress may adopt are the only currency known to the Constitution. But if they have other power to regulate the currency, it was conferred to be exercised by themselves, and not to be transferred to a corporation. If the bank be established for that purpose, with a charter unalterable without its consent, Congress have parted with their power for a term of years, during which the Constitution is a dead letter. It is neither necessary nor proper to transfer its legislative power to such a bank, and therefore unconstitutional.
    • Andrew Jackson, veto mesage rgarding the Bank of the United States[2] (1832-07-10)
    • Often paraphrased as: If Congress has the right under the constitution to issue paper money, it was given them to be used by themselves, not to be delegated to individuals or corporations.
  • I wish it were possible to obtain a single amendment to our Constitution. I would be willing to depend on that alone for the reduction of the administration of our government to the genuine principles of its Constitution; I mean an additional article, taking from the federal government the power of borrowing.
  • And I sincerely believe, with you, that banking establishments are more dangerous than standing armies; and that the principle of spending money to be paid by posterity, under the name of funding, is but swindling futurity on a large scale.
  • No servant can serve two masters. Either he will hate the one and love the other, or he will be devoted to the one and despise the other. You cannot serve both God and Money.
  • No money is better spent than what is laid out for domestic satisfaction.
    • Samuel Johnson, Stated on 14 April 1776, quoted in Boswell's Life of Samuel Johnson (1791).

K[edit]

  • Throw money at a problem and it will remain.
    • Tony Kakko (Sonata Arctica), Abandoned, Pleased, Brainwashed, Exploited.
  • It would undeniably be a superb invention by laughter to imagine eternity in a financial predicament-ah, but then let us weep a little because temporality has so completely forgotten eternity and forgotten that from the eternal point of view money is less that nothing! Alas, many are of the opinion that the eternal is a delusion and that money is the reality, whereas in the understanding of eternity and of truth money is a delusion. Think of eternity in whatever way you want to; only admit that many of the temporal things you have seen in temporality you wished to find again in eternity, that you wished to see the trees and the flowers and the stars again, to hear the singing of the birds and the murmuring of the brooks again, but, could it ever occur to you that there would be money in eternity? No, then the kingdom of heaven itself would again become a land of misery, and therefore this cannot possibly occur to you, just as it cannot possibly occur to someone who believes money is reality that there is an eternity.
  • Any man who spends his income, whether large or small, benefits the community by putting money in circulation.
    • Kekewich, J., In re Nottage (1895), L. R. 2 C. D. [1895], p. 653. Reported in James William Norton-Kyshe, The Dictionary of Legal Quotations (1904), p. 177.
  • Dollar Diplomacy.
    • Term applied to Secretary Knox's activities in securing opportunities for the investment of American capital abroad, particularly in Latin America and China; also in Honduras and Liberia. Defended by President William Howard Taft, Message to Congress (Dec. 3, 1912). Huntington Wilson aided Knox in framing the Policy. See Harper's Weekly, April 23, 1910, p. 8. Reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 521-24.
  • Ah, take the Cash, and let the Credit go,
    Nor heed the rumble of a distant Drum!
    • Omar Khayyam, Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam (1120), Stanza 13. FitzGerald's translation. ("Promise" for "credit"; "Music" for "rumble" in 2nd ed). Reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 521-24.
  • Money in the pocket, devil in the heart.
    • Ivo Kozarčanin, Gruop of Authors: Velika knjiga aforizama, Prosvjeta-Globus, Vol. IV, 1984

L[edit]

  • To borrow money, big money, you have to wear your hair in a certain way, walk in a certain way, and have about you an air of solemnity and majesty — something like the atmosphere of a Gothic cathedral.
  • That's right. While economic textbooks claim that people and corporations are competing for markets and resources, I claim that in reality they are competing for money - using markets and resources to do so. So designing new money systems really amounts to redesigning the target that orients much human effort.
    Furthermore, I believe that greed and competition are not a result of immutable human temperament; I have come to the conclusion that greed and fear of scarcity are in fact being continuously created and amplified as a direct result of the kind of money we are using. For example, we can produce more than enough food to feed everybody, and there is definitely enough work for everybody in the world, but there is clearly not enough money to pay for it all. The scarcity is in our national currencies. In fact, the job of central banks is to create and maintain that currency scarcity. The direct consequence is that we have to fight with each other in order to survive.
    Money is created when banks lend it into existence. When a bank provides you with a $100,000 mortgage, it creates only the principal, which you spend and which then circulates in the economy. The bank expects you to pay back $200,000 over the next 20 years, but it doesn't create the second $100,000 - the interest. Instead, the bank sends you out into the tough world to battle against everybody else to bring back the second $100,000.
  • Your money's value is determined by a global casino of unprecedented proportions: $2 trillion are traded per day in foreign exchange markets, 100 times more than the trading volume of all the stockmarkets of the world combined. Only 2% of these foreign exchange transactions relate to the "real" economy reflecting movements of real goods and services in the world, and 98% are purely speculative. This global casino is triggering the foreign exchange crises which shook Mexico in 1994-5, Asia in 1997 and Russia in 1998. These emergencies are the dislocation symptoms of the old Industrial Age money system.
  • Money is an agreement within a community to use something as a medium of exchange.
  • We, as lawyers, as men of business, as men of experience, know perfectly well what evils necessarily result from handing over a great family estate to a mortgagee in possession, whose only chance of getting his money is to sacrifice the interests of everybody to money-getting.
    • Nathaniel Lindley, Baron Lindley, L.J., In re Marquis of Ailesbury's Settled Estates (1891), L. J. Rep. 61 C. D. 123. Reported in James William Norton-Kyshe, The Dictionary of Legal Quotations (1904), p. 177.
  • Nec quicquam acrius quam pecuniæ damnum stimulat.
    • Nothing stings more deeply than the loss of money.
    • Livy, Annales, XXX. 44. Reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 521-24.
  • Take care of the pence, and the pounds will take care of themselves.
    • William Lowndes, Section of Treasury under William III, George I. Reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 521-24.
  • As a rule, there is nothing that offends us more than a new kind of money.
    • Robert Lynd, The Pleasures of Ignorance (1921), p. 215.

M[edit]

  • But for money and the need of it, there would not be half the friendship in the world. It is powerful for good if divinely used. Give it plenty of air, and it is sweet as the hawthorn; shut it up, and it cankers and breeds worms.
  • One cannot help regretting that where money is concerned, it is so much the rule to overlook moral obligations.
    • Malins, V.-C., Ellis v. Houston (1878), L. R. 10 0. D. 240. Reported in James William Norton-Kyshe, The Dictionary of Legal Quotations (1904), p. 177.
  • Up and down the City Road,
    In and out the Eagle,
    That's the way the money goes—
    Pop goes the weasel!
    • Popular street song in England in the late 1850s, sung at the Grecian Theatre. Attributed to W. R. Mandale. Reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 521-24.
  • Money plays the largest part in determining the course of history
  • I who can have, through the power of money, everything for which the human heart longs, do I not possess all human abilities? Does not my money, therefore, transform all my incapacities into their opposites.
    • Karl Marx, Economical and Philosophical Manuscripts (1844).
  • Since money does not disclose what has been transformed into it, everything, whether a commodity or not, is convertible into gold. Everything becomes saleable and purchasable. Circulation is the great social retort into which everything is thrown and out of which everything is recovered as crystallized money. Not even the bones of the saints are able to withstand this alchemy; and still less able to withstand it are more delicate things, sacrosanct things which are outside the commercial traffic of men. Just as all qualitative differences between commodities are effaced in money, so money, a radical leveller, effaces all distinctions. But money itself is a commodity, an external object, capable of becoming the private property of an individual. Thus social power becomes private power in the hands of a private person.
  • Luat in corpore, qui non habet in ære.
The money which a man possesses is the instrument of freedom.; that which we eagerly pursue is the instrument of slavery. ~ Jean-Jacques Rousseau
We ought not to have more use and esteem of money and coin than of stones. And the devil seeks to blind those who desire or value it more than stones. ~ Francis of Assisi
Plato said that virtue has no master. If a person does not honor this principle and rejoice in it, but is purchasable for money, he creates many masters for himself. ~ Apollonius of Tyana
Most of the people … were unhappy … much of the time. Many solutions were suggested for this problem, but most of these were largely concerned with the movement of small green pieces of paper, which was odd because on the whole it wasn't the small green pieces of paper that were unhappy. ~ Douglas Adams
The usual definition of the functions of money are that money is a medium of exchange, a measure of value, a standard of deferred payment and a store of value. ~ Sir Norman Angell
If I can acquire money and also keep myself modest and faithful and magnanimous, point out the way, and I will acquire it. ~ Epictetus
It's no trick to make a lot of money, if all you want to do is make a lot of money. ~ "Everett Sloane" in Citizen Kane
Money plays the largest part in determining the course of history. ~ Karl Marx
The love of money is the root of all evil: which while some coveted after, they have erred from the faith, and pierced themselves through with many sorrows. ~ Paul of Tarsus
What power has law where only money rules? ~ Petronius
I know of nothing more despicable and pathetic than a man who devotes all the hours of the waking day to the making of money for money's sake. ~ John D. Rockefeller
Everybody needs money. That's why it's called "money". ~ Danny Devito
Money, which represents the prose of life, and is hardly spoken of in parlors without apology, is, in its effects and laws, as beautiful as roses. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson
If I can acquire money and also keep myself modest and faithful and magnanimous, point out the way, and I will acquire it. ~ Epictetus
Money. Cause of all evil, Auri sacra fames. The god of the day—but not to be confused with Apollo. Politicians call it emoluments; lawyers, retainers; doctors, fees; employees, salary; workmen, pay; servants, wages. "Money is not happiness." ~ Gustave Flaubert
In numerous years following the war, the Federal Government ran a heavy surplus. It could not (however) pay off its debt, retire its securities, because to do so meant there would be no bonds to back the national bank notes. To pay off the debt was to destroy the money supply. ~ John Kenneth Galbraith
The earning of money should be a means to an end; for more than thirty years — I began to support myself at sixteen — I had to regard it as the end itself. ~ George Gissing
A man who works at another’s will, not for his own passion or his own need, but for money or honor, is always a fool. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
To be controlled in our economic pursuits means to be always controlled unless we declare our specific purpose. Or, since when we declare our specific purpose we shall also have to get it approved, we should really be controlled in everything. ~ Friedrich Hayek
If you are different, you had better hide it, and pretend to be solemn and wooden-headed. Until you make your fortune. For most wooden-headed people worship money; and, really, I do not see what else they can do. ~ Oliver Heaviside
Fight thou with shafts of silver, and o'ercome
When no force else can get the masterdome. ~ Robert Herrick
Every era has a currency that buys souls. In some the currency is pride, in others it is hope, in still others it is a holy cause. There are of course times when hard cash will buy souls, and the remarkable thing is that such times are marked by civility, tolerance, and the smooth working of everyday life. ~ Eric Hoffer
They may talk of the plugging and sweating
Of our coinage that's minted of gold,
But to me it produces no fretting
Of its shortness of weight to be told:
All the sov'reigns I'm able to levy
As to lightness can never be wrong,
But must surely be some of the heavy,
For I never can carry them long. ~ Thomas Hood

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